Tag Archives: Lynne M. Jackson

Archdiocese of St. Louis Juneteenth Event: Forgive Us Our Sins

The Archdiocese of St. Louis will host “Forgive Us Our Trespasses,” a Maafa commemoration and procession on Saturday, June 18, in Downtown St. Louis.

Maafa, which is a Swahili word for “great disaster,” is a traditional procession to memorialize the lives of those lost during the Middle Passage, or transatlantic slave trade.

Archbishop Mitchell Rozanski and other faith leaders will begin the event at 9 a.m. with a prayer service at the Basilica of Saint Louis, King of France (Old Cathedral). The procession will include stops at sites related to the slave trade and local enslavement of Africans.

The event also will include a formal acknowledgement of the Archdiocese of St. Louis’ past involvement with the institution of slavery. The archdiocese has been researching its involvement in the slave trade as part of an effort called “Forgive Us Our Trespasses.”

For more information, contact Joyce Jones at joycejones@archstl.org or Eric Fair at ericfair@archstl.org.

https://www.archstl.org/maafa-procession-in-new-orleans-acknowledges-the-pain-of-the-slave-trade-archdiocese-of-st-louis-to-hold-similar-event-in-june-7440

Dred Scott Inducted into the Missouri Public Affairs Hall of Fame

We are grateful for this honor and acknowledgement.  Our thanks go to the board and the staff that made it possible and assisted us during the process.

You can read more here:

St. Louis American Article

Missouri State University Article

Before Brown V Board of Education

67th Anniversary of the Brown Foundation

Before Brown v. Board: A look at Dred Scott v. Sandford and Plessy v. Ferguson. Panelist include Lynne M. Jackson, Keith Plessy, and Phoebe Ferguson.

Cheryl Brown Henderson,
Founder Brown Foundation

A More or less perfect union

In honor of Constitution Day, the Free to Chose Network is airing their 2020 production of A MORE OR LESS PERFECTION UNION, exploring the constitution in three one hour segments, featuring the Dred Scott case. Join Justice Douglas Ginsburg on a PBS channel near you or on YouTube and Amazon Prime. Click on the image below to watch online and to check local listings. The St. Louis metropolitan area can watch on Sunday, September 13th on PBS at 8:00 p.m. CST.

Dred Scott visits summer camp

Brenda Young invited Apostolic Women STL to help summer Sun Splash Summer Camp celebrate their final day with Camp Director, Velma Bailey on August 28, 2020.  Brenda share motivational thoughts with the campers.

Bessie Pugh hung out to encourage the kids.  Barry Pugh taught them how to say Philippians 4:13 in 5 languages. Lynne Jackson told them who Dred Scott was and gave each one a Dred Scott “million dollar bill” from the Dred Scott Heritage Foundation to encourage them about the fact that “… even enslaved people can make a difference and be remembered.  If they can so can we!”

breakfast and lunch with legends

The last event of 2020 so far turned out to be Breakfast and  Lunch with Legends sponsored by the National Youth Summit, the youth organization founded by Dr. Christi Griffin.  This was a local reprise of the program given in Jackson, Mississippi where descendants of Dred Scott and Frederick Doulgass shared history.  Lynne Jackson and Kenneth Morris.  The breakfast moderator was Maxine Clark of Build A Bear and the lunch moderator was Dr. Benjamin Akande, past president of Webster University. 

Read full story

The Faces of reconciliation

The great-great granddaughter of Dred and Harriet Scott will speak on the Lincoln University campus on Tuesday, February 25. Lynne M. Jackson, President and Founder of the Dred Scott Heritage Foundation, will speak at 7 p.m. in Richardson Fine Arts Center. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.

Scott’s great-great grandfather was the namesake for the United States Supreme Court Case Dred Scott V. John F.A. Sanford (1857), commonly known as the Dred Scott decision. In their decision, the court ruled that Scott, an enslaved person who had resided in the free state of Illinois and free territory of Wisconsin, was not entitled to his freedom due to that fact that the United States Constitution did not consider African Americans citizens of this country. This decision added fuel to the growing discourse that would eventually lead to the Civil War.